Some Positive Thoughts on Positivity

Earlier this morning as I was doing my daily patient rounding, one of the nurses I’d said ‘good morning’ to smiled and told me how much she enjoyed seeing me every day. “You always have such a positive energy around you,” she said. “It really brings the mood up when you come and talk to patients and to us. I really appreciate you.”

Wow. What a lovely thing to hear.

I sort of blushed and said thank you but what I really wanted to tell her was that it was a very deliberate decision every morning to show up with a smile. 

We patient experience directors have to walk a tricky line. On the one hand, we’re trying to dispel the outdated thinking that patient experience is ‘fluff stuff’ led by a bunch of vapid do-gooders who have no clue about real life. And at the same time, we can’t appear jaded and cynical or give in to all the forces that tell us that other things are more important.

I’ve taken a bit of heat in my career trying to be positive. I’ve encountered plenty of eye rolls, arms folded firmly across chests, sarcasm, and open hostility. I’ve been dismissed from meetings with a flick of the wrist, interrupted, had my data challenged in every conceivable way, and told ‘that’s nice, but we have real work to do.’

I’ve even had patients tell me to leave when I’ve come to round on them after learning I wasn’t a physician or a nurse. If I can’t give them pain meds then what good am I?

I have to choose to be positive. But honestly, why would I choose to be anything else? 

I’ve been angry, frustrated, outspoken, sarcastic, and cynical myself and you know where it got me? No further than being positive. Being positive just makes me feel better. Noticing the good, recognizing when something goes well, celebrating people who give a little extra… these things make me happy. And knowing that by doing them I can make someone else happy makes me even more happy. 

Staff perform better when the culture is positive. The world has enough desk pounders, enough cynics, enough people who are eager to rain on your parade. If I expect staff to be supportive and friendly and caring to patients, how can I not be that way to them?

So yes, when I walk in the front door, step off the elevator, and onto a med/surg unit, I am smiling. I am positive. Even if I have to fake it for a few minutes. Fluff stuff? No way. I’m changing healthcare.

Author: Kate Kalthoff

It's simple: leave people, places, and things better than I found them. For more than 20 years, Katherine Kalthoff has been working to improve the way healthcare organizations connect with the people they serve. She began her career at Gift of Hope, the organ procurement organization for Illinois, approaching families and securing their consent to donate a loved one’s organs for transplant. Through compassionate, empathetic listening, Kate led the Family Services team to one of the highest consent rates in the country. From there, Kate went to Advocate Health Care, Illinois’s largest healthcare system, as a Physician Relations and Business Development Manager, improving physician satisfaction and strengthening the relationships of both the employed and independent physicians with the system as a whole. Just prior to joining Northwest Community Healthcare as the Patient Experience Officer, Kate was the first Manager of Patient Experience at DuPage Medical Group where she built a platform of organization-wide service excellence through her inspiring brand of education, training, and one-on-one coaching. A much sought-after speaker and trainer, Kate has a very simple approach to her work: leave people, places and things better than you found them.

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