I Did My Job

Lately, I’ve been part of some skills training that focuses a lot on checklists. I think there’s a lot to be said for being very specific when you’re trying to teach someone how to interact professionally and compassionately with people. For many, these are skills that don’t come naturally and we need to show some concrete actions that demonstrate warmth and caring. Simply telling someone to be nice often isn’t very helpful. Everyone thinks they’re nice.

There’s no shortage of checklists out there for behavioral standards and ways to make patients feel more comfortable, but what if you do all the things on the checklist and patients are still unhappy?

I had a coaching session with someone for this very thing. He couldn’t understand why, after doing everything he was taught to do, patients still complained about him. He made sure he said hello, introduced himself and his role, he explained how long the tests would take and what was going to happen. He even said thank you at the end of every patient encounter. His manager was having a very difficult time giving him some helpful feedback because he was doing everything on the checklist and still not getting very good survey scores from patients.

To me, the answer was obvious. He wasn’t connecting.

I was looking at a perfectly competent employee with very good technical skills who was simply going through the motions without any sincerity. He was focused on his to-do list, there to do a job and complete a series of tasks, doing just enough to not get fired.

When we put the focus solely on ourselves and our actions, we forget that experience is a two-way street. Simply doing the items on a checklist doesn’t guarantee that the other person understands what we’ve said or interprets those things as helpful. It takes a genuine connection, even if it’s brief, to demonstrate caring to a patient.

Simply saying hello doesn’t convey a warm greeting but “Say Hello” was an item on the checklist. Should we have written “Sincerely and warmly greet every person with whom you come in contact”? Well, if that’s what you want, then that’s what you need to write if you’re going to use a checklist.

A better way is to hire people for whom this comes naturally. Warmth is tough to teach.

Thankfully, my coaching story does have a happy ending. This employee used to display warmth and sincerity with patients, but over time, he got jaded, bored, and burned-out. All it took was a little reminder from me about why he went into this field and he was able to reconnect with that part of himself he’d let go dormant. For those that never had it to begin with, I wonder if you can teach it. I’d rather spend my training budget helping people with the right kind of interpersonal skills and a desire to get even better.

What kinds of criteria are you using to hire your employees?

Author: Kate Kalthoff

It's simple: leave people, places, and things better than I found them. For more than 20 years, Katherine Kalthoff has been working to improve the way healthcare organizations connect with the people they serve. She began her career at Gift of Hope, the organ procurement organization for Illinois, approaching families and securing their consent to donate a loved one’s organs for transplant. Through compassionate, empathetic listening, Kate led the Family Services team to one of the highest consent rates in the country. From there, Kate went to Advocate Health Care, Illinois’s largest healthcare system, as a Physician Relations and Business Development Manager, improving physician satisfaction and strengthening the relationships of both the employed and independent physicians with the system as a whole. Just prior to joining Northwest Community Healthcare as the Patient Experience Officer, Kate was the first Manager of Patient Experience at DuPage Medical Group where she built a platform of organization-wide service excellence through her inspiring brand of education, training, and one-on-one coaching. A much sought-after speaker and trainer, Kate has a very simple approach to her work: leave people, places and things better than you found them.

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